ANTHROPOLOGIE : FORAGE WINDOWS

After I returned from Iceland in June, I began working on displays and installations for Anthropologie part-time. Just a few weeks ago, I was ecstatic to receive an offer to become their full-time Display Coordinator. Not a day goes by that I don't wake up excited to design, build, sew, paint, draw, and photograph--sometimes all in a single day. Some days I find it hard to NOT go in to work. But it is a job that requires some serious work and some serious hours, but for someone who loves to create and make as much as me, also has a huge payoff.  

This post is for my first window--a process during which I have learned a lot about Anthro's specific aesthetic as well as how our designers create incredibly inspiring things...on a surprisingly low budget. They remain at the forefront of reclamation, recycling, and re-imagining common things. I highly recommend rummaging the interwebs for previous windows and installations...there are a lot of them seeing as we change them out every season. Hardly a single day passed from my final fall installation that I was already excitedly thrown into winter's installation. 

This fall at the Anthropologie, we were inspired by mossy woodland strolls and the little details that draw your eyes from the canopy above to the forest floor below--the delicate and whimsical curly cues of fiddlehead ferns and the little families of mushrooms so full of character as they bend and climb. 

Although electrical conduit pipe and rebar wire structurally supported the curl and bending of my gigantic ferns, the overall palette remained soft and organic: canvas, burlap, twine, yarn, ferns, stumps, and mulch. Nearly all the materials were reclaimed from other projects or scavenged from forests (legally, of course!) and the free section of Craigslist (thank you, kind shirtless stranger who allowed me to take the pine logs off your property in Nowheresville, USA). 

The color palette draws from the neutrals and greens of the forest while the painted backdrop draws from the shafts of warm light that penetrate the darker forest floor.