ANTHROPOLOGIE : SUMMER IMPRESSIONIST WINDOWS

This summer at Anthropologie, we were caught amid a summer field of flowers. A photographed rolling landscape of pink lupins morphs into a dimensional impressionist painting as the lupins are deconstructed into soft yarn paint "strokes" of pinks.

Inspired by my love of textile and fiber arts, the "strokes" are comprised of hand dyed lengths of wool yarn, nylon paracord, cotton twine, twill tape, etc tied in lark's head knots around a dyed wooden dowel that protrudes out from the painting at varying depths. 

This window by far challenged me the most in terms of budget and execution. To minimize any excess materials, diagrams enabled me to calculate near exact amounts of lumber, canvas, cotton twine, twill tape, and undyed wool yarn. 

I must have flowers, always and always.
— Claude Monet
 Original sketch in Photoshop

Original sketch in Photoshop

 FInal window

FInal window

 Wool yarn, cotton twine, twill tape, nylon cord hand dyed and hanging to dry

Wool yarn, cotton twine, twill tape, nylon cord hand dyed and hanging to dry

 Textures of the varying materials

Textures of the varying materials

 Lark's head knots over a dyed wooden dowel

Lark's head knots over a dyed wooden dowel

 Two massive canvas frames were constructed from 2x3 lumber and then stretched with canvas and hung in the window. The photo mural was mirrored and painted grid by grid  using latex paint mixed with joint compound for thickness.

Two massive canvas frames were constructed from 2x3 lumber and then stretched with canvas and hung in the window. The photo mural was mirrored and painted grid by grid  using latex paint mixed with joint compound for thickness.

 A string grid was strung over the photo mural and the blank canvas so that each grid could be mirrored, sketched, and painted.

A string grid was strung over the photo mural and the blank canvas so that each grid could be mirrored, sketched, and painted.


ANTHROPOLOGIE : ELLY THE ELEPHANT

Spring brought all sorts of new projects at Anthropologie including building a life-size elephant! (Well, you know, maybe a teenager sized elephant). Her canvas "skin" is rough and wrinkled from layers of rolled on Elmer's glue and latex paint and pretty convincing.... Although not pictured, her tail is my favorite part as it's made from long dried grass. 

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I was lucky enough to have an occasional hand with the project (literally to keep her from falling down/apart). Below are some progress shots with my wonderful helper Kelsey. 

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ANTHROPOLOGIE : BAMBOO STRUCTURE

While I've only posted images of my Anthropologie window displays up until recently, there are a plethora of interior displays I just adored creating. It's always fun to begin a project with teaching yourself new techniques...I am a fiend when it comes to researching new methods and artistic media! (Oh and recalling different types of knots my dad taught me as a kid. Dad, I hope you're happy you taught me to tie hundreds of pieces of bamboo together.)

For this project, I got to combine my love of simple architectural gestures, structural cantalevers, a tasteful ombré, bamboo....and weaving! All the horizontal bamboo slats were hand painted to fade from a green to it's natural yellow above. Hand dyed torn strips of canvas woven into the slats also accentuate this color transition. 

While most of the arch is real bamboo, the risers used to merchandise our home products were all hand fabricated and painted "bamboo."

ANTHROPOLOGIE : SUMMER MACRAMÉ

Last week I installed one of my favorite projects to create....a set of massive hanging macramé mobiles made of driftwood, shells, clay, copper, and jute.  I absolutely LOVE learning new artistic and production processes...For this project I got to dip my hands into some light macramé techniques (wishing I had time to incorporate it more) and even a little bathroom science experimentation to "assist" the copper to patina into beautiful greens.